ancientart:

Aztec artifacts relating to sacrifice found at Templo Mayor, Postclassic period.

The first image shows a Tecpatl sacrificial knife.

[2nd photo] The allusion to human sacrifice and death is evident in this pair of eccentrics carved in stone, in which the artist combines the blade of the knife with the silhouette of the human skull, whose nose can be seen as an additional sacrificial knife.

[3rd photo] The object primarily used in human sacrifice was the knife with a wooden handle and blade knapped from chert and was called tecpatl. In the wooden carved portion of this piece the depicted head is of an individual with a complex headdress that would be worn during a ritual.

-National Museum of Anthropology

Artifacts courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photos taken by Travis S.

mini-girlz:

Seated Woman Figurine
Period:Late Naqada II
Date: ca. 3450–3300 B.C.
Geography:Country of Origin Egypt, Northern Upper Egypt, Possibly Naqada
Medium: Limestone, organic material, paint, malachite
Dimensions: D. 22.8 x H. 19.8 x W. 9.4 cm (9 x 7 13/16 x 3 11/16 in.)
This limestone figurine is the finest preserved of unusual group of Predynastic statuettes. These seated women display beak-like noses and missing or schematized arms. The hair, narrow waist and wide hips are clearly shown to emphasize female sexuality. The light colored surface created an ideal canvas for painted details, including jewelry and animal figures that scholars now believe are associated with a ritual activity. Her eyes were enhanced with green malachite and her elaborate coiffure was modeled separately using a mixture of plant matter and fats. She wears a series of necklaces in red and green beads and unusual beaded anklets.
via > metmuseum.org

mini-girlz:

Seated Woman Figurine

Period:Late Naqada II

Date: ca. 3450–3300 B.C.

Geography:Country of Origin Egypt, Northern Upper Egypt, Possibly Naqada

Medium: Limestone, organic material, paint, malachite

Dimensions: D. 22.8 x H. 19.8 x W. 9.4 cm (9 x 7 13/16 x 3 11/16 in.)

This limestone figurine is the finest preserved of unusual group of Predynastic statuettes. These seated women display beak-like noses and missing or schematized arms. The hair, narrow waist and wide hips are clearly shown to emphasize female sexuality. The light colored surface created an ideal canvas for painted details, including jewelry and animal figures that scholars now believe are associated with a ritual activity. Her eyes were enhanced with green malachite and her elaborate coiffure was modeled separately using a mixture of plant matter and fats. She wears a series of necklaces in red and green beads and unusual beaded anklets.

via > metmuseum.org

(via bibidebabideboo)

de-salva:

Bronze Leopard Head (Benin)
Photo by Herbert List

de-salva:

Bronze Leopard Head (Benin)

Photo by Herbert List

(via bibidebabideboo)

japaneseaesthetics:

Handle in the Form of an Animal Head, c. 1000–300 B.C.
Earthenware 12 cm high (5 in. high) Purchased with Funds Provided by the Weston Foundation; President’s Exhibition and Acquisition Fund, 2010.294.  Art Institute of Chicago.

Only a handful of animals are represented in Jomon-period art. This piece is in the shape of the head of an animal; it looks like a horse from one side and a sheep from the other. The walls of the indentations are carefully modeled, not simply pressed into the clay with a stick. Judging by the curved back surface, it seems likely that this head came off of a vessel and was perhaps a handle that sat on the rim (with the curved surface at the back forming part of the interior wall of a jar).

japaneseaesthetics:

Handle in the Form of an Animal Head, c. 1000–300 B.C.

Earthenware
12 cm high (5 in. high)

Purchased with Funds Provided by the Weston Foundation; President’s Exhibition and Acquisition Fund, 2010.294.  Art Institute of Chicago.

Only a handful of animals are represented in Jomon-period art. This piece is in the shape of the head of an animal; it looks like a horse from one side and a sheep from the other. The walls of the indentations are carefully modeled, not simply pressed into the clay with a stick. Judging by the curved back surface, it seems likely that this head came off of a vessel and was perhaps a handle that sat on the rim (with the curved surface at the back forming part of the interior wall of a jar).

ancientart:

Ancient Art Exclusive: behind the scenes at the Semitic Museum, Harvard University -Part 2.

You can also check out the rest of the photos taken at the Semitic Museum (including part 1 of the behind the scenes photos).

Photos taken by B. Kelly.

blackpaint20:

Mayan Pre-Columbian art in the National Gallery of Victoria Vera Cruz; Head showing life and death
 300-600 bc

blackpaint20:

Mayan Pre-Columbian art in the National Gallery of Victoria Vera Cruz; Head showing life and death

300-600 bc

(via f-featherbrain)

japaneseaesthetics:

"DOGU" ceramics, which were discovered in remains of Aomori. Jomon-era. BC.3,500 - BC.2,500. Aomori Japan. Via Pinterest

japaneseaesthetics:

"DOGU" ceramics, which were discovered in remains of Aomori. Jomon-era. BC.3,500 - BC.2,500. Aomori Japan. Via Pinterest

(via hiddenbydeities)

ancientart:

The Nebra sky disk, found near Nebra, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany. It is dated to c. 1600 BCE, and is associated with the Bronze Age Unetice culture.
This artifact weighs 2.2 kg, and is inlaid with gold symbols. It is thought that this disk was an astronomical instrument, and likely also held religious significance. This find reconfirms the abilities and astronomical knowledge of the people of the European Bronze Age, which included the sun’s angle between its rising and setting points at summer and winter solstice, and close observation of the sun’s course over the year. The Nebra sky disk is the oldest known “portable instrument” showing such measurements.
The disk appears to have been developed in four stages (Meller 2004):
1) On the right is the waxing moon, on the left the full moon, and between and above, the Pleiades.

2) Arcs are added on the horizon for the zones of the setting and rising of the sun. Individual stars were shifted and/or covered.

3) The “sun boat” is added.

4) The disk in its current condition. A star and part of the full moon (or sun) was restored.

(The diagrams used are by Rainer Zenz)
Euan MacKie suggests that the Nebra disk can be linked to Alexander Thom’s reconstructed solar calendar from his analysis of standing stone alignments in Britain.
Courtesy & currently located at the State Museum of Prehistory in Halle, Germany. Photo taken by Anagoria.

ancientart:

The Nebra sky disk, found near Nebra, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany. It is dated to c. 1600 BCE, and is associated with the Bronze Age Unetice culture.

This artifact weighs 2.2 kg, and is inlaid with gold symbols. It is thought that this disk was an astronomical instrument, and likely also held religious significance. This find reconfirms the abilities and astronomical knowledge of the people of the European Bronze Age, which included the sun’s angle between its rising and setting points at summer and winter solstice, and close observation of the sun’s course over the year. The Nebra sky disk is the oldest known “portable instrument” showing such measurements.

The disk appears to have been developed in four stages (Meller 2004):

1) On the right is the waxing moon, on the left the full moon, and between and above, the Pleiades.

2) Arcs are added on the horizon for the zones of the setting and rising of the sun. Individual stars were shifted and/or covered.

3) The “sun boat” is added.

4) The disk in its current condition. A star and part of the full moon (or sun) was restored.

(The diagrams used are by Rainer Zenz)

Euan MacKie suggests that the Nebra disk can be linked to Alexander Thom’s reconstructed solar calendar from his analysis of standing stone alignments in Britain.

Courtesy & currently located at the State Museum of Prehistory in Halle, Germany. Photo taken by Anagoria.

ancientart:

Dogu (Clay Figure) of Early-Middle Jomon.
Jomon period, 7,000-2,000 BC.
Courtesy & currently located at the Tokyo National Museum, Japan. Photo taken by B.Kelly.

ancientart:

Dogu (Clay Figure) of Early-Middle Jomon.

Jomon period, 7,000-2,000 BC.

Courtesy & currently located at the Tokyo National Museum, Japan. Photo taken by B.Kelly.

(via japaneseaesthetics)