tammuz:

Detail of a relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Detail of a relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

(via bibidebabideboo)

ancientart:

Sculptures from the Temple of Zeus at Olympia.

Lantern slides courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives, Goodyear Archival Collection (1, 2, 3 & 4).

ymutate:

Terracotta head, Nok culture, Nigeria, 36 cm (14 in) high, c.500bc. National Museum, Lagos.

ymutate:

Terracotta head, Nok culture, Nigeria, 36 cm (14 in) high, c.500bc. National Museum, Lagos.

romkids:

The head of a pipe made by Canadian First Peoples. 
As the smoke is blown from their mouth and then down the pipe, it would emerge from the head at the end, creating a fascinating effect!

romkids:

The head of a pipe made by Canadian First Peoples.

As the smoke is blown from their mouth and then down the pipe, it would emerge from the head at the end, creating a fascinating effect!

(via ancientart)

ancientart:

Human-headed winged bull and winged lion (lamassu). Neo-Assyrian, ca. 883–859 B.C. Nimrud (ancient Kalhu).

The so-called Standard Inscription that ran across the surface of most of the reliefs described Ashurnasirpal’s palace:
"I built thereon [a palace with] halls of cedar, cypress, juniper, boxwood, teak, terebinth, and tamarisk [?] as my royal dwelling and for the enduring leisure life of my lordship." 
The inscription continues: “Beasts of the mountains and the seas, which I had fashioned out of white limestone and alabaster, I had set up in its gates. I made it [the palace] fittingly imposing.” 
Such limestone beasts are the human-headed, winged bull and lion pictured here. The horned cap attests to their divinity, and the belt signifies their power. The sculptor gave these guardian figures five legs so that they appear to be standing firmly when viewed from the front but striding forward when seen from the side. These lamassu protected and supported important doorways in Assyrian palaces. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections. Accession Number: 32.143.1–.2

ancientart:

Human-headed winged bull and winged lion (lamassu). Neo-Assyrian, ca. 883–859 B.C. Nimrud (ancient Kalhu).

The so-called Standard Inscription that ran across the surface of most of the reliefs described Ashurnasirpal’s palace:

"I built thereon [a palace with] halls of cedar, cypress, juniper, boxwood, teak, terebinth, and tamarisk [?] as my royal dwelling and for the enduring leisure life of my lordship."

The inscription continues: “Beasts of the mountains and the seas, which I had fashioned out of white limestone and alabaster, I had set up in its gates. I made it [the palace] fittingly imposing.”

Such limestone beasts are the human-headed, winged bull and lion pictured here. The horned cap attests to their divinity, and the belt signifies their power. The sculptor gave these guardian figures five legs so that they appear to be standing firmly when viewed from the front but striding forward when seen from the side. These lamassu protected and supported important doorways in Assyrian palaces. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections. Accession Number: 32.143.1–.2

ancientart:

Section from the Lachish relief: a stone panel from the South-West Palace of Sennacherib (no.10). Nineveh, northern Iraq, Neo-Assyrian, dates to about 700-681 BC.
This relief tells the story of the siege and capture of the city of Lachish in 701 BC.

Having been exiled from their city, the people of Lachish move through the countryside to be resettled elsewhere in the Assyrian Empire. Below them high officials and foreigners are being tortured and executed. 

It is likely that they are being flayed (skinned) alive.

The foreigners are possibly officers from Nubia. The Nubians were seen as sharing responsibility for the rebellion. Much of Egypt at this time was ruled by a line of kings from Nubia (the Twenty-fifth Dynasty) who were keen to interfere in the politics of the Levant, to contain the threat of Assyrian expansion. (BM)

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Chris Phillips.

ancientart:

Section from the Lachish relief: a stone panel from the South-West Palace of Sennacherib (no.10). Nineveh, northern Iraq, Neo-Assyrian, dates to about 700-681 BC.

This relief tells the story of the siege and capture of the city of Lachish in 701 BC.

Having been exiled from their city, the people of Lachish move through the countryside to be resettled elsewhere in the Assyrian Empire. Below them high officials and foreigners are being tortured and executed. 

It is likely that they are being flayed (skinned) alive.

The foreigners are possibly officers from Nubia. The Nubians were seen as sharing responsibility for the rebellion. Much of Egypt at this time was ruled by a line of kings from Nubia (the Twenty-fifth Dynasty) who were keen to interfere in the politics of the Levant, to contain the threat of Assyrian expansion. (BM)

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Chris Phillips.

aleyma:

Moche culture of Peru, Ornament in the form of a feline face, c.100-450 (source).

aleyma:

Moche culture of Peru, Ornament in the form of a feline face, c.100-450 (source).

(via ymutate)

anachoretique:

"Big" Shaman’s Headdress
Nvikh
The Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography
"This headdress of a “big” Evenk shaman (avun) made of steel was part of a full ritual costume worn by a shaman for very important rites and rituals. The structure of this headdress reflects its symbolic meaning and contains an archaic image of the model of the Universe. The hoop embodies the concept of the closed space of the world of people and solid earth. Two crossing arcs symbolize the parts of the world and the seasons. The cosmic vertical that reflects the sacral center of the Universe is embodied in the horns of the mythical deer that stands for the sun in the mythical beliefs of the peoples of northern Asia. The deer was one of the main characters in the myth about the celestial hunt and embodied the archaic concepts of the day and night and the cosmic order. The horns also symbolized the sacred deer – the helper spirit of the shaman, his draft animal that he rode to travel to other worlds. Long cloth ribbons embody snakes and lizards, the shaman’s powerful helpers that accompany him in his “travels” to the lower world. They also symbolize the sacred birch – the totem tree of the shaman. It is also associated with the World Tree that symbolizes the Universe as a whole and Axis mundi – the cosmic axis connecting the spheres of the Universe. Such ritual headdresses were conditionally referred to as “crowns”."

anachoretique:

"Big" Shaman’s Headdress

Nvikh

The Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography

"This headdress of a “big” Evenk shaman (avun) made of steel was part of a full ritual costume worn by a shaman for very important rites and rituals. The structure of this headdress reflects its symbolic meaning and contains an archaic image of the model of the Universe. The hoop embodies the concept of the closed space of the world of people and solid earth. Two crossing arcs symbolize the parts of the world and the seasons. The cosmic vertical that reflects the sacral center of the Universe is embodied in the horns of the mythical deer that stands for the sun in the mythical beliefs of the peoples of northern Asia. The deer was one of the main characters in the myth about the celestial hunt and embodied the archaic concepts of the day and night and the cosmic order. The horns also symbolized the sacred deer – the helper spirit of the shaman, his draft animal that he rode to travel to other worlds. Long cloth ribbons embody snakes and lizards, the shaman’s powerful helpers that accompany him in his “travels” to the lower world. They also symbolize the sacred birch – the totem tree of the shaman. It is also associated with the World Tree that symbolizes the Universe as a whole and Axis mundi – the cosmic axis connecting the spheres of the Universe. Such ritual headdresses were conditionally referred to as “crowns”."

(via ymutate)

ancientart:

Egyptian ceremonial Saw in the Shape of a Ma’at-feather, ca. 1353-1336 B.C.E. 
What was Ma’at?
A difficult concept to summarize, but I would describe it as the Egyptian concept of balance, truth, law, order, justice, and morality; it was also personified as a goddess -identifiable by the feather she always wears on her head. 
Here are a few more examples of Ma’at being represented elsewhere in Egyptian art:
On The Papyrus of Ani showing the ”Weighing of the Heart.” Note the Ma’at feather on the right scale
Relief of Ma’at shown in the Temple of Edfu, Egypt.
Scarab with Script Sign Combination at the Walters Art Museum. 

It was the duty of all Egyptians to live in accordance with Ma’at. Only if they did so could they join the society of the dead when they died. In the final judgement that every Egyptian (even the king) had to pass through, the heart of the deceased was weighed against a feather to determine if his or her actions in life (symbolized by the heart) were in balance with Ma’at (the feather).
Unlike the final trail of Christian tradition, this was not a religious judgement but a social one: people who had been disruptive elements in the society of the living could hardly expect to be welcomed by members of the blessed society of the dead.
-James P. Allen, Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs (2000).

The shape of the shown saw suggestions that it was used for ceremonial purposes, possibly preparing meat for sacrifice to a god. Artifact courtesy & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, photo via their online collections. 

ancientart:

Egyptian ceremonial Saw in the Shape of a Ma’at-feather, ca. 1353-1336 B.C.E. 

What was Ma’at?

A difficult concept to summarize, but I would describe it as the Egyptian concept of balance, truth, law, order, justice, and morality; it was also personified as a goddess -identifiable by the feather she always wears on her head. 

Here are a few more examples of Ma’at being represented elsewhere in Egyptian art:

It was the duty of all Egyptians to live in accordance with Ma’at. Only if they did so could they join the society of the dead when they died. In the final judgement that every Egyptian (even the king) had to pass through, the heart of the deceased was weighed against a feather to determine if his or her actions in life (symbolized by the heart) were in balance with Ma’at (the feather).

Unlike the final trail of Christian tradition, this was not a religious judgement but a social one: people who had been disruptive elements in the society of the living could hardly expect to be welcomed by members of the blessed society of the dead.

-James P. Allen, Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs (2000).

The shape of the shown saw suggestions that it was used for ceremonial purposes, possibly preparing meat for sacrifice to a god. Artifact courtesy & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, photo via their online collections

ancientart:

The Palma Sola archaeological site in Acapulco, Mexico.
These petroglyphs date from 200 BC to AD 600, and are located deep within a forest above Acapulco. The Palma Sola archaeological site is one of the 12 known petroglyphs sites in the Acapulco area. Little is known about the site, or the people who created these drawings.
The shown section from the site is called Element 2. The sign near these petroglyphs reads:

For Pre-Hispanic societies myths held the keys to the endless repetition of cycles, and whoever had command of them was able to give guidance to the community in terms of issues as important as birth, puberty, adulthood and death, as well as of all the rituals that sealed the agreement with the deities.
This petroglyph shows in three different panels the involvement of people in community celebrations in order to procure the attention and aids of the gods. People are show dancing and praying. Individuals from various kinship groups are differentiated from one another by lines that represent the link to their forefathers.

From the same sign, here’s an illustration showing the details of the petroglyphs:

Photos courtesy & taken by Kim F.

ancientart:

The Palma Sola archaeological site in Acapulco, Mexico.

These petroglyphs date from 200 BC to AD 600, and are located deep within a forest above Acapulco. The Palma Sola archaeological site is one of the 12 known petroglyphs sites in the Acapulco area. Little is known about the site, or the people who created these drawings.

The shown section from the site is called Element 2. The sign near these petroglyphs reads:

For Pre-Hispanic societies myths held the keys to the endless repetition of cycles, and whoever had command of them was able to give guidance to the community in terms of issues as important as birth, puberty, adulthood and death, as well as of all the rituals that sealed the agreement with the deities.

This petroglyph shows in three different panels the involvement of people in community celebrations in order to procure the attention and aids of the gods. People are show dancing and praying. Individuals from various kinship groups are differentiated from one another by lines that represent the link to their forefathers.

From the same sign, here’s an illustration showing the details of the petroglyphs:

Photos courtesy & taken by Kim F.